... ... Greg Johnson | ART Elements Gallery

Greg Johnson

Greg Johnson

Ceramics

 Greg Johnson has been throwing pots since 1999 when he took a high school class under the great Rudy Seehawer at McMinnville High School where he was given a very strong foundation in a choice based ceramics program. Later, Greg went on to undergraduate studies at George Fox University where he studied art and business. Under the influence of Mark Terry, he was given guidance and freedom to develop his work toward his particular style and aesthetic. Greg was also given the opportunity to explore more technical aspects of ceramics while at George Fox University. After graduation he went on to work at Mossy Creek Pottery under the artistic genius of master potter Dan Wheeler. While he would never hear it, Dan is probably the best potter Greg has ever seen; Greg was so blessed to spend time working under his guidance. He has become the strongest influence in Greg’s work and tuned his skills and helped Greg develop a maturity in his work. In 2009 Greg enrolled in an MAT program at George Fox University with aspirations toward becoming an art teacher. After graduating he was offered a job at Tigard High School to start a ceramics program. Currently Greg is developing this new program and having a blast doing it.

Sometimes I think that creating clay animals is one of the things I’m designed for. For most of my life, I have been sculpting animals out of one substance or another. For kindergarten Show and Tell, I sculpted dogs and cats out of the wax on Gouda cheese balls. A few years later, I started making snow horses and snow cows instead of snowmen. These days, I use clay shaped roughly into the form of some animal caught in an instant of time. After the clay animal is fired, I bury it in sawdust, then light the sawdust on fire. When the burn is done, I am left with smoke colored animals. I brush ashes off them, look them over and either put them away until they go to a gallery, or leave them out to keep me company while I make more.  My animals look the way they do because this is how my hands do poetry. There is enough there to capture the moment, but no more.